PRP Blog

  • Nutrition, Health & Performance SUMMIT Podcast: Episode #2 - Jamie Pugh: Probiotics, A New Player In the Sports Supplements World?

    dr jamie pugh

    Dr Jamie Pugh (PhD) is a post-doctoral research at Liverpool John Moores University. After graduating from world-renowned Loughborough University with first class honours in Sports and Exercise Science, Jamie spent time as a sports science intern with Swansea City FC. After this, Jamie spent time working with PRP Supplements and Aliment Nutrition while studying for a PGCert in Exercise and Nutrition Sciences at University of Chester, before eventually beginning his PhD at Liverpool John Moores University.

    In This Episode We Discuss With Dr. Jamie Pugh:

    – How Jamie came to start his PhD and the journey to get there

    – Working with world-leading experts like Prof. Graeme Close

    – Common causes of gut symptoms in runners

    – Jamie’s most recent studies including a new study looking at the effect of probiotics on gut symptoms in marathon runners

    – The Lab4 probiotics used in the study, why these were chosen and what to look for in a probiotic

    – The most memorable moments of working at Liverpool John Moores University

    – What’s next after completing his PhD, including future studies looking at the effects of probiotics on exercise metabolism

    nutrition health performance summit

    Nutrition, Health & Performance Summit Live 2019

    – Some of the most renowned practitioners, researchers and speakers in the world of sports performance and nutrition
    – Experienced speakers from different backgrounds that have worked with professional teams and athletes
    – Learn how to research is translated into practice at the highest level

    Find out more…

    Download the Podcast and Subscribe:

    PRP-podcast-itunes
    PRP-Podcast-tunein
    PRP-Podcast-spotify

     

    If you are taking any prescribed medication or have any medical conditions ALWAYS consult your doctor or pharmacist BEFORE taking vitamins or supplements. Food supplements must not be used as a substitute for a varied and balanced diet and a healthy lifestyle. If pregnant or lactating, ALWAYS consult your doctor before use. Or if you have any queries about any supplement ALWAYS consult a QUALIFIED medical professional.

     

    Please click here to read our legal disclaimer on all products and advice.

  • Nutrition, Health & Performance SUMMIT Podcast - Episode #1 With Heather Pearson

    heather pearson

    Heather Pearson MSc ST MSMA MART Dip Sp. Psych., Dip APT., is a well-respected sports therapist and strength coach. After a traumatic car crash Heather changed industry, became a therapist and coach and founded 1body4life. 15 years later, Heather has travelled the world to learn from the most elite coaches’ and health professionals. Heather has become an expert in her field and is renowned for resolving complex injuries with her innovative, self-created systems of diagnosis and rehabilitation, advanced soft tissue skills, nutrition and sports psychology work. Heather has worked with a range of professional athletes including top level lifters, physique competitors, football players and ironman athletes as well as strength coaches and personal trainers in the UK and across Europe. For more information on Heather, click here.

    In this episode we discuss with Heather Pearson:

    – Heather’s recently published book on back pain called ‘Back Pain Free – Put an end to your suffering with the Pearson Method’ and why she has it

    – How she motivates clients to carry out rehab exercises during their daily life and the tips and tricks she uses to get results

    – The three main causes of back pain – weakness in the glutes, hamstrings and the core (or a combination of these 3)

    – The relationship between sedentary lifestyles and back pain

    nutrition health performance summit

    Nutrition, Health & Performance Summit Live 2019

    – Some of the most renowned practitioners, researchers and speakers in the world of sports performance and nutrition
    – Experienced speakers from different backgrounds that have worked with professional teams and athletes
    – Learn how to research is translated into practice at the highest level

    Find out more…

    Download the Podcast and Subscribe:

    PRP-podcast-itunes
    PRP-Podcast-tunein
    PRP-Podcast-spotify

     

    If you are taking any prescribed medication or have any medical conditions ALWAYS consult your doctor or pharmacist BEFORE taking vitamins or supplements. Food supplements must not be used as a substitute for a varied and balanced diet and a healthy lifestyle. If pregnant or lactating, ALWAYS consult your doctor before use. Or if you have any queries about any supplement ALWAYS consult a QUALIFIED medical professional.

     

    Please click here to read our legal disclaimer on all products and advice.

  • Introducing Prof. Graeme Close of John Moores University, Liverpool

    Graeme Close

    Originally Prof. Graeme Close was a Professional rugby league player, Graeme is now a Professor in Human Physiology at Liverpool John Moores University where he combines his academic research with nutrition and physiology consultancy to some of the worlds leading sporting individuals and organisations.

    Graeme Close in Professional Sport

    As well as leading a masters degree in sport nutrition Graeme is currently the expert nutrition consultant to England Rugby, he is the lead nutritionist to Everton Football Club and works with some of the worlds leading golfers such as Jason Day, the British Number 1 tennis player Johanna Konta and he also works with many Rugby League players. On top of this, and despite spending most of his professional career helping big people get bigger, he currently receives funding from Sheikh Mansour Bin Zayed Al Nahyan (the owner of Manchester City FC) to help professional jockeys make-weight safely. Graeme is also ranked in the top 10 most followed sport scientists in the world on twitter. He regularly appears on British National TV and radio discussing various aspects of nutrition in relation to health and sporting performance.

    World Leading Public Speaker

    It is this combination of academic theory (Graeme has published over 100 papers and review articles and spoken at over 50 conferences across the globe) and applied practice that has enabled Graeme to establish himself as a world-leading nutrition consultant and public speaker. Graeme is the only person in the UK who is an accredited sports nutritionist (SENr), sports scientist (BASES) and strength and conditioning coach (UKSCA). He is the deputy chair of the Sport and Exercise Nutrition Register and has recently received a prestigious fellowship from the British Association of Sport & Exercise Sciences (BASES).
    You can check out Prof. Graeme Close’s blog here at http://www.closenutrition.com/
    nutrition health performance summit

    See Prof. Graeme Close Speak at Nutrition, Health & Performance Summit 2019

    – Some of the most renowned practitioners, researchers and speakers in the world of sports performance and nutrition
    – Experienced speakers from different backgrounds that have worked with professional teams and athletes
    – Learn how to research is translated into practice at the highest level

    Find out more…

    If you are taking any prescribed medication or have any medical conditions ALWAYS consult your doctor or pharmacist BEFORE taking vitamins or supplements. Food supplements must not be used as a substitute for a varied and balanced diet and a healthy lifestyle. If pregnant or lactating, ALWAYS consult your doctor before use. Or if you have any queries about any supplement ALWAYS consult a QUALIFIED medical professional.

     

    Please click here to read our legal disclaimer on all products and advice.

  • Can Probiotics Help Hay Fever and Other Allergic Conditions?

    probiotics and hay fever

    Airborne allergens, such as pollen, dander and dust mites, affect a large number of people and can lead to hay fever symptoms. These symptoms can be uncomfortable and distressing and for those of us looking for natural alternatives to medication, probiotics might form part of the solution.

    There is increasing evidence that these friendly bacteria (probiotics) may help in preventing and alleviating allergic conditions. Whilst some foods, such as live yoghurt, kefir and sauerkraut contain high levels of friendly gut bacteria, these foods do not appear in abundance in today’s diet and taking probiotics in supplement form may be the best option for achieving the required balance of bacteria in our gut.

    probiotic and hay fever

    View Our Probiotic Range

    – Contains extensively studied Lab4 probiotic consortium
    – Successful results in clinical trials on allergies
    – A range of different products for different requirements

    Find out more…

    How Can Probiotics Help Hay Fever?

    Friendly bacteria can help to modify the balance of bacteria in the gut and help to boost the immune system. They can also help by increasing the levels of an antibody (secretory IgA), which lines the respiratory and gastro-intestinal tracts and helps to reduce the effect of allergens.

    Much of the research relating to probiotics and the prevention and reduction of symptoms of allergy has been done with children. The Lab4 group of probiotics found in the ProVen Probiotics products has been shown to help in the prevention of allergy, when given to babies during the last trimester of pregnancy and the first six months of infancy. In a study involving 454 mother-baby pairs, the babies who received the Lab4 friendly bacteria were 50% less likely to develop allergies by two year of age than the babies who did not receive the probiotics [1].

    References

    1. [1] Allen SJ et al 2014. Probiotics in the prevention of eczema: a randomised controlled trial. Archives of Disease in Childhood 99(11): 1014–1019

     

    If you are taking any prescribed medication or have any medical conditions ALWAYS consult your doctor or pharmacist BEFORE taking vitamins or supplements. Food supplements must not be used as a substitute for a varied and balanced diet and a healthy lifestyle. If pregnant or lactating, ALWAYS consult your doctor before use. Or if you have any queries about any supplement ALWAYS consult a QUALIFIED medical professional.

     

    Please click here to read our legal disclaimer on all products and advice.

  • CBD Oil - What's The Big Deal?

    CBD Oil

    What Is CBD Oil?

    CBD oil seems to be the ‘buzz’ at the moment, everyone seems to be trying it! With so many suggested benefits which you can find on the internet, I can see why.

    CBD stands for Cannabidiol, and the oil is usually made up from hemp seeds and hemp extract. The hemp seed oil comes from the pressing of the seeds of the plant as the name would suggest, and the extract comes from the leaves and stalks of the plant itself.

    CBD-Oil

    CBD Oil – Now £15.95 Instead of £19.95

    – High quality approved CBD Oil
    – THC Free
    – 5% CBD Oil
    – Suitable for vegetarians and vegans

    Find out more…

    Where Does CBD Come From?

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is extracted from the cannabis plant, specifically the hemp strain. With no psychoactive or addictive effects, it is perfectly legal and safe to take. It is believed CBD oil acts on the endocannabinoid system in our bodies, and much of the current buzz surrounding scientific research on CBD focuses on the benefits this non-intoxicating compound can have on our wellbeing.

    You may have read that CBD’s status as a food supplement has changed, however, CBD oil is still legal and safe to consume.

    It is important when choosing which CBD oil to purchase, that you buy one which comes from EU approved supply, and that it complies with the European standards for THC content, pesticide use, and Heavy metals.

    What’s The Best Way to Take CBD Oil?

    The great thing about CBD oil is that is it suitable for vegetarians and vegans as it comes directly from the plant.

    This ensures that the oil is absorbed quickly and effectively into your bloodstream maximising the benefits. If you are new to CBD Oil, it is advisable to start with a low dose and to build up your intake gradually over a few weeks, until you find the dosage that best suits your needs. For best results CBD Oil is taken sublingually (under your tongue).

    What Are the Benefits Of CBD Oil?

    We have recently been hearing feedback from lots of different people who have tried CBD oil for reasons such as pain relief, in muscle recovery to helping with their anxiety.

    Studies have shown that CBD may help reduce chronic pain by impacting endocannabinoid receptor activity, reducing inflammation and interacting with neurotransmitters .

    For example, one study in rats found that CBD injections reduced pain response to surgical incision, while another rat study found that oral CBD treatment significantly reduced sciatic nerve pain and inflammation.*(References below)

    We all react differently to nutritional supplements. If you are new to CBD, it’s important to start low and slow with your dosage and build it up slowly over time if needed. If you’re taking any prescribed medication, as with any nutritional supplement please consult your doctor before use.

    Our CBD Oil

    Aliment CBD Oil is “Grown from Certified EU seeds, according to regulation (EC) no 112212009 with Commission Implementing Regulation (EU) no 393/2013, Council directive 20021571EC and Article 39 (1) of regulation (EC) no 7312009”.

    The Aliment/PRP oil is certified by a Eurpean ISO laboratory. It is confirmed to have non-detectable levels of total THC; approved for pesticides and contaminants in accordance to the council regulation (EC) No396/2005 and No 839/2008, (EC) No 1881/2006 and (EU) 165/2010; and conforms to the heavy metal regulation in accordance to Council regulation (EC) No 1881/2006 (EC) No 835/2011.

    We are fortunate to operate in a heavily regulated industry with no room for misleading promises. As a responsible company we cannot make health claims for CBD oil. However, we do encourage you to research this ingredient for yourself, with plenty of resources online explaining CBD’s huge popularity.

    References

    Front Pharmacol. 2017; 8: 391.

    Published online 2017 Jun 21. doi: 10.3389/fphar.2017.00391

    Cannabidiol Is a Potential Therapeutic for the Affective-Motivational Dimension of Incision Pain in Rats

    Karina Genaro,1,2,* Débora Fabris,1,2 Ana L. F. Arantes,1,2 Antônio W. Zuardi,1,3 José A. S. Crippa,1,3 and Wiliam A. Prado2,4

    Eur J Pharmacol. 2007 Feb 5;556(1-3):75-83. Epub 2006 Nov 10.

    The non-psychoactive cannabis constituent cannabidiol is an orally effective therapeutic agent in rat chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain.

    Costa B1, Trovato AE, Comelli F, Giagnoni G, Colleoni M.


     

    If you are taking any prescribed medication or have any medical conditions ALWAYS consult your doctor or pharmacist BEFORE taking vitamins or supplements. Food supplements must not be used as a substitute for a varied and balanced diet and a healthy lifestyle. If pregnant or lactating, ALWAYS consult your doctor before use. Or if you have any queries about any supplement ALWAYS consult a QUALIFIED medical professional.

     

    Please click here to read our legal disclaimer on all products and advice.

  • Jamie Pugh - SUMMIT 2019

    Jamie Pugh Summit

    PRP/Aliment have been hosting seminars for years. However, the Nutrition, Health & Performance Summit will be the best and most informative yet.

    5 different speakers with a wealth of experience from many different backgrounds, you will learn how Nutrition and Performance are managed at the highest level and how research is translated into meaningful practice.

    We have a little bit of what Dr. Jamie Pugh will be covering in the SUMMIT 2019 below…

    What Jamie Pugh Will Be Covering

    While the research into probiotics has surged in the last couple of decades, one of the areas to have only recently been examined are the effects of probiotics on sports performance. Probiotics have the potential to directly or indirectly influence performance through improvements in immune function, reducing gastrointestinal symptoms, altering the gut-brain axis and, in new research that will be presented, potentially altering our exercise metabolism. With so many probiotic products on the market, Jamie will dissect the differences between products and explain how to make informed choices when it comes to choosing a product. As part of the presentation, some of the latest findings in regards to the bacterial composition (microbiota) of elite athletes that have been shown.
    Here’s a preview from the last seminar…
    nutrition health performance summit

    See Dr. Jamie Pugh Speak at Nutrition, Health & Performance Summit 2019

    – Some of the most renowned practitioners, researchers and speakers in the world of sports performance and nutrition
    – Experienced speakers from different backgrounds that have worked with professional teams and athletes
    – Learn how to research is translated into practice at the highest level

    Find out more…

    If you are taking any prescribed medication or have any medical conditions ALWAYS consult your doctor or pharmacist BEFORE taking vitamins or supplements. Food supplements must not be used as a substitute for a varied and balanced diet and a healthy lifestyle. If pregnant or lactating, ALWAYS consult your doctor before use. Or if you have any queries about any supplement ALWAYS consult a QUALIFIED medical professional.

     

    Please click here to read our legal disclaimer on all products and advice.

  • Spring Marathon or Triathlon? Avoid Gut Issues During Race Day

    gut issues during race

    During endurance races like marathon running and long-distance triathlon, up to 90% of those taking part have reported gut issues during a race such as heartburn, nausea, bloating, abdominal cramps, vomiting, flatulence, the increased urge to defecate, and diarrhea [1]. While these symptoms can be mild (we have all ran behind someone with a bit of gas), they can also be detrimental to performance, and even force us to drop out of the race. There are many reasons why we experience these symptoms during endurance exercise including changes in blood flow as we redirect blood that usually goes to our gut towards our working muscles, hormonal alterations, neural effects, and the mechanical movement of exercise. However, there are things we can do to reduce the likelihood of suffering from gut problems on race day.

     

    Practice Your Race Nutrition

    When it comes to racing, may people load up on carbohydrates the day before, and then take on drinks, gels and all sorts of other foods to try to fuel their efforts. However, if you have not practiced this in training, it could spell disaster. Consuming more fluid or carbohydrates than you are used to, or that you can tolerate, can lead to bloating, cramps, nausea, as it cannot be emptied from our stomachs and then absorbed from our intestines quickly enough. On your longest runs, practice matching your planned fuelling strategy exactly. It’s not enough to sip on a sports drink or taking the odd gel in training if you are then planning on taking on board much larger amounts on race day. If you are planning on 2 gels an hour, for example, then build in training sessions where you go through the exact strategy. Use the same brands as you are going to use on race day as well. If there are only a couple weeks left until your race, all is not lost. A study from Australia has shown that runners reduced their gut symptoms during a 2 hour run after 2 weeks of ‘gut training’ by consuming carbohydrates during their training runs [2]. This lead to reductions in carbohydrate malabsorption and gut symptoms, and improvements in performance.

    intensive training probiotics

    Shown in Clinical Trials To Help Relieve GI Symptoms During Exercise

    – Formulated for performance
    – Used in two clinical trials with endurance athletes
    – 25 Billion viable cells per capsule
    – Helps aid digestion during intense exercise
    – Contains extensively studied Lab4 consortium. Also contains L-Glutamine, N-Acetyl Glucosamine and ElavTP

    Find out more…

    Take a bath

    It has been shown in a number of studies that greater increases in our body’s core temperature appears to lead to great gut damage and symptoms. Cooling strategies during the race such as cold drinks, water sprays, and finding shade can all help slow down the rise in core temperature. Another successful method to help is to acclimate to the heat before you even toe the start line. For those of us who maybe don’t have the time or money to head out on a warm weather training camp like the elites, there is a simpler and much more economical way to do this – taking a bath. It has been shown that taking a 40 min hot bath (40C) submerged to the neck for 6 consecutive days has a large effect on acclimating athletes to exercise in the heat [3].

    Pre-race feeding

    What you eat the day before the race can have a big impact on your chances of experiencing gut symptoms. Like what you eat during the race, you should practice your pre-race day fuelling strategy in training. The day before a long training effort, practice eating the same breakfast, lunch, dinner and snacks that you plan to eat the day before a race.

    In general it has been found that, before competition, consuming high amounts of fat, fibre, red meat or non-digestible, fermentable carbohydrates (FODMAPs) have all been linked to gut symptoms of some sort [1, 4]. While removing all of these from your diet is obviously not advisable during everyday life – most of them are essential for our overall health – some athletes have looked to used reduced fibre diets with high glycaemic carbohydrates (e.g. white rice) and lean, easier to digest meats (e.g. chicken) in the day before a major competition.

    nutrition health performance summit

    See Dr. Jamie Pugh Speak at Nutrition, Health & Performance Summit 2019

    – Some of the most renowned practitioners, researchers and speakers in the world of sports performance and nutrition
    – Experienced speakers from different backgrounds that have worked with professional teams and athletes
    – Learn how to research is translated into practice at the highest level

    Find out more…

    Medication

    Think long and hard before taking unnecessary medications before a race. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can worsen the damage caused to our digestive tract during exercise [5]. Marathon runners report more gut symptoms after taking ibuprofen and aspirin, and show greater markers of gut damage [6].

    Probiotics

    Lab4 probiotics are the first to show potential benefits to endurance athletes during exercise. To date, Lab4 probiotics have been shown to reduce gut symptoms during training in triathletes [7], and during a marathon race in runners. When athletes have consumed Lab4 probiotics, they have reported fewer and less severe gut symptoms than those taking a placebo. This is perhaps not surprising given the probiotics have been shown to be beneficial to individuals suffering from irritable bowel syndrome, who often share similar symptoms to endurance athletes.

    References

    1. de Oliveira, E.P., R.C. Burini, and A. Jeukendrup, Gastrointestinal complaints during exercise: prevalence, etiology, and nutritional recommendations. Sports Medicine, 2014. 44(1): p. 79-85.
    2. Costa, R.J.S., et al., Gut-training: the impact of two weeks repetitive gut-challenge during exercise on gastrointestinal status, glucose availability, fuel kinetics, and running performance. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab, 2017. 42(5): p. 547-557.
    3. Zurawlew, M.J., et al., Post-exercise hot water immersion induces heat acclimation and improves endurance exercise performance in the heat. Scand J Med Sci Sports, 2016. 26(7): p. 745-54.
    4. Lis, D., et al., Case Study: Utilizing a Low FODMAP Diet to Combat Exercise-Induced Gastrointestinal Symptoms. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab, 2016. 26(5): p. 481-487.
    5. Playford, R.J., et al., Co-administration of the health food supplement, bovine colostrum, reduces the acute non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced increase in intestinal permeability. Clin Sci (Lond), 2001. 100(6): p. 627-33.
    6. Smetanka, R.D., et al., Intestinal permeability in runners in the 1996 Chicago marathon. Int J Sport Nutr, 1999. 9(4): p. 426-33.
    7. Roberts, J.D., et al., An Exploratory Investigation of Endotoxin Levels in Novice Long Distance Triathletes, and the Effects of a Multi-Strain Probiotic/Prebiotic, Antioxidant Intervention. Nutrients, 2016. 8(11).

     

    If you are taking any prescribed medication or have any medical conditions ALWAYS consult your doctor or pharmacist BEFORE taking vitamins or supplements. Food supplements must not be used as a substitute for a varied and balanced diet and a healthy lifestyle. If pregnant or lactating, ALWAYS consult your doctor before use. Or if you have any queries about any supplement ALWAYS consult a QUALIFIED medical professional.

     

    Please click here to read our legal disclaimer on all products and advice.

  • Ketogenic Diet Plan

  • Want The Right Ingredients For Your Workout?

    hiit fuel pre workout PRP Supplements
  • GI (Gastrointestinal) Symptoms During Exercise

    gastrointestinal symptoms exercise

    Gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms are generally thought of as heartburn, nausea, bloating, abdominal cramps, vomiting, flatulence, the increased urge to defecate, and diarrhea. This wide range of symptoms each have their own and overlapping causes and so it is difficult to identify a single factor. Changes in blood flow, hormonal alterations, neural effects, psychological stress, mechanical movement during exercise, dehydration, our diets – even altitude, medications, and the climate can all have effects on our digestive tract and be a potential cause of gut symptoms.

    When it comes to gut symptoms during exercise, endurance athletes typically report more gut symptoms than athletes from other sports – especially long distance runners. Up to 90% of ultramarathon runners report gut symptoms during racing, and describe symptoms as a leading cause of under-performing [1]. Across sports, while athletes tend not to report this same high frequency of symptoms, there is still a significant number that reports symptoms severe enough that they affect an athlete’s quality of life [2]. But what are some of the common factors that could lead to some of these symptoms?

    intensive training sports probiotic

    Shown in Clinical Trials To Help Relieve GI Symptoms During Exercise

    – Formulated for performance
    – Used in two clinical trials with endurance athletes
    – 25 Billion viable cells per capsule
    – Helps aid digestion during intense exercise
    – Contains extensively studied Lab4 consortium. Also contains L-Glutamine, N-Acetyl Glucosamine and ElavTP

    Find out more…

    Diet

    In general it has been found that, before competition, consuming high amounts of fat, fibre, red meat or non-digestible, fermentable carbohydrates (FODMAPs) have all been linked to gut symptoms of some sort [3, 4]. While removing all of these from your diet is obviously not advisable during everyday life – most of them are essential for our overall health – some athletes have looked to used reduced fibre diets with high glycaemic carbohydrates (e.g. white rice) and lean, easier to digest meats (e.g. chicken) in the day before a major competition.

    Stress

    In the general public, persistent GI symptoms are associated with psychological traits such as stress and anxiety [5, 6]. In a group of triathletes, GI symptoms were perceived to be worse when psychological stress was present [7]. Athletes have also reported GI symptoms directly before competition, believed to be from psychological stress [8]. . It is also believed that psychological stress can result in changes in intestinal permeability, more commonly known as ‘leaky gut’ [9].

    Excess or Unaccustomed Carbohydrate and Fluid

    Eating or drinking large amounts of carbohydrates as either gels or drinks during endurance races is a common practice by both elite and non-elite athletes. However, taking on large amounts of these, having never done so before, can spell disaster. Our guts will have not been trained to empty these from our stomachs, and absorb them from our small intestine quickly enough. This can lead to them being malabsorbed – and the reason why many endurance athletes report gut symptoms during the later stages of a race. If you plan to take on any fuel during exercise, you need to train your guts and practice it in training. Start with small amounts, eventually building up until you are mimicking the exact same fuelling strategy you want to use during competition.

    nutrition health performance summit

    Nutrition, Health & Performance Summit

    – Some of the most renowned practitioners, researchers and speakers in the world of sports performance and nutrition
    – Experienced speakers from different backgrounds that have worked with professional teams and athletes
    – Learn how to research is translated into practice at the highest level

    Find out more…

    Dehydration

    Exercise, particularly in the heat ( when athletes report more gut symptoms, can lead to dehydration because of sweat loses. Dehydration has been shown to be another factor to affect GI symptoms [10-12]. This may be due to the increase in gut damage that occurs during exercise when individuals restrict their fluid intake [11].

    Medication

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can change our gut permeability [13]. This may be the reason why marathon runners report more gut symptoms after taking ibuprofen and aspirin [14]. Additionally, one of the common side effects of anti-biotics is diarrhea.

     

    You can head over to the Sigma Nutrition Website to hear Dr. Jamie Pugh talk about this on a Podcast

    References

    1. Hoffman, M.D. and K. Fogard, Factors related to successful completion of a 161-km ultramarathon. Int J Sports Physiol Perform, 2011. 6(1): p. 25-37.
    2. Pugh, J.N., et al., Gastrointestinal symptoms in elite athletes: time to recognise the problem? Br J Sports Med, 2018. 52(8): p. 487-488.
    3. de Oliveira, E.P., R.C. Burini, and A. Jeukendrup, Gastrointestinal complaints during exercise: prevalence, etiology, and nutritional recommendations. Sports Medicine, 2014. 44(1): p. 79-85.
    4. Lis, D., et al., Case Study: Utilizing a Low FODMAP Diet to Combat Exercise-Induced Gastrointestinal Symptoms. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab, 2016. 26(5): p. 481-487.
    5. Hauser, G., S. Pletikosic, and M. Tkalcic, Cognitive behavioral approach to understanding irritable bowel syndrome. World J Gastroenterol, 2014. 20(22): p. 6744-58.
    6. Koloski, N.A., N.J. Talley, and P.M. Boyce, The impact of functional gastrointestinal disorders on quality of life. Am J Gastroenterol, 2000. 95(1): p. 67-71.
    7. Sullivan, S.N., Exercise-associated symptoms in triathletes. The Physician and Sportsmedicine, 1987. 15(9): p. 105-108.
    8. Worobetz, L.J. and D.F. Gerrard, Gastrointestinal symptoms during exercise in Enduro athletes: prevalence and speculations on the aetiology. N Z Med J, 1985. 98(784): p. 644-6.
    9. Mayer, E.A., Gut feelings: the emerging biology of gut-brain communication. Nat Rev Neurosci, 2011. 12(8): p. 453-66.
    10. Glace, B., C. Murphy, and M. McHugh, Food and fluid intake and disturbances in gastrointestinal and mental function during an ultramarathon. Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab, 2002. 12(4): p. 414-27.
    11. Lambert, G., et al., Fluid restriction during running increases GI permeability. International journal of sports medicine, 2008. 29(3): p. 194-198.
    12. Rehrer, N.J., et al., Fluid intake and gastrointestinal problems in runners competing in a 25-km race and a marathon. Int J Sports Med, 1989. 10 Suppl 1: p. S22-5.
    13. Playford, R.J., et al., Co-administration of the health food supplement, bovine colostrum, reduces the acute non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced increase in intestinal permeability. Clin Sci (Lond), 2001. 100(6): p. 627-33.
    14. Smetanka, R.D., et al., Intestinal permeability in runners in the 1996 Chicago marathon. Int J Sport Nutr, 1999. 9(4): p. 426-33.

     

    If you are taking any prescribed medication or have any medical conditions ALWAYS consult your doctor or pharmacist BEFORE taking vitamins or supplements. Food supplements must not be used as a substitute for a varied and balanced diet and a healthy lifestyle. If pregnant or lactating, ALWAYS consult your doctor before use. Or if you have any queries about any supplement ALWAYS consult a QUALIFIED medical professional.

     

    Please click here to read our legal disclaimer on all products and advice.

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